What are yeast infections?

Your own itch to talk?

You suspect a yeast infection? It is estimated that 3 out of 4 women have a yeast infection at least one time in their lives. This is a common condition. A yeast infection occurs when there is an overgrowth of yeast in your vagina, it is manifested first by bothersome symptoms such as:

  •     itching and burning sensation in the vagina and the surrounding region,
  •     burning sensation in the evacuation of urine (when you pee),
  •     vaginal pain or discomfort during intercourse,
  •     white discharge that may look like cottage cheese (they can also be thinner or absent).
Shedding light on the yeast!

Did you know that yeast can be found in your vagina even if you do not have a yeast infection? Yeast, also called Candida, seat naturally in a healthy vagina and other parts of the body, along with several species of bacteria that promote health. Normally, yeast and bacteria do not cause you any problems unless they are increasing in abundance.

There are many types of Candida. If you have a yeast infection, it is most likely caused by the species called Candida albicans, which causes about 90% of all yeast infections. A rarer species, Candida glabrata, because most of the other 10% of infections may be more difficult to treat. For this reason, among many others, you should consult your doctor before you start treating yourself your yeast infection. Fill in the form of our "Guide to the Doctor Discussion" to prepare for your appointment with the doctor.

Although yeast can infect other parts of your body, the term "yeast infections" often refers to yeast infections in the vagina. These infections are also known as female yeast infections, vaginal yeast infections, or vaginitis. Vaginitis is a broader term that includes infection due to the proliferation of yeast and many other causes of inflammation in the vagina and surrounding areas. The information provided here is a based yeast infection in the vagina. Want to learn more about yeast infections present on other parts of your body? Visit our library of health disorders.


Share this

Related Posts

Previous
Next Post »