Why should we treat high blood pressure?

The treatment of high blood pressure is extremely important for many reasons. Over time, increased pressure of blood in the arteries and veins can cause damage to important organs such as eyes, kidneys, brain and heart. The longer we wait before processing, the more damage can be significant.

 The decision to give treatment to a person who has high blood pressure depends on several factors:
  •     family history;
  •     his level of physical activity;
  •     his other medical conditions;
  •     other medications they are taking;
  •     her risk of heart disease;
  •     the fact that she smokes.
High blood pressure requires medical monitoring and treatment because it greatly increases the risk of complications that can lead to premature death or severe disability. People who have high blood pressure have a risk two to three times more likely to have heart disease or stroke, not to mention the increased risk of having kidney problems. Without treatment, high blood pressure can cause hardening of the arteries (or atherosclerosis) and other problems related to pressure, which can cause:
  •     of confusion;
  •     vision problems;
  •     heart failure;
  •     renal failure;
  •     premature death;
  •     stroke.
However, by lowering your blood pressure to an acceptable level and maintaining it within the normal reference values ​​throughout your life, you will help prevent these complications. A decrease of 10 mmHg in systolic and 5 mmHg in diastolic blood pressure can lead to considerable health benefits. Using a treatment to lower your blood pressure, you can reduce your risk of heart failure by more than 50%, your risk of stroke by a factor of 35% to 42% and your risk of heart attack by a factor of 20% to 25%.

A goal

If you have high blood pressure, your doctor will recommend a treatment that will help you achieve a specific blood pressure goals. This objective, which include two figures, will depend on your current health status. The usual goal is a systolic pressure under 140 mmHg and a diastolic pressure below 90 mmHg, that is to say less than "140 over 90." People who have diabetes should aim for a less than 130 mmHg for systolic and less than 80 mmHg for diastolic pressure.

The decrease in blood pressure requires a change. Your doctor will discuss changes in lifestyle and medications that may help you lower your blood pressure.

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